Ethiopian Food in Dubai | Ethiopian Traditional Food | Zagol Restaurant

Share it with your friends Like

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

Close

My Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/za1nsohail/

Thanks to Zagol Restaurant management for having us!
Zagol Restaurant location: https://goo.gl/maps/1S7kADAoYqYch3vo8

Ethiopian cuisine consists of vegetable and often very spicy meat dishes. This is usually in the form of wat, a thick stew, served atop injera, a large sourdough flatbread, which is about 50 centimeters in diameter and made out of fermented teff flour.

Injera:
Injera is a sour fermented flatbread with a slightly spongy texture, traditionally made out of teff flour. It is the national dish of Ethiopia and Eritrea. It is central to the dining process in those cultures as bread is the most fundamental component.

Kitfo:
Another distinctively Ethiopian dish is kitfo. It consists of raw (or rare) beef mince marinated in mitmit (a very spicy chili powder similar to the berbere) and niter kibbeh.

Ayibe:
Ayibe is a cottage cheese that is mild and crumbly. It is much closer in texture to crumbled feta. Although not quite pressed, the whey has been drained and squeezed out. It is often served as a side dish to soften the effect of very spicy food. It has little to no distinct taste of its own.

Doro wat:
It is made from chicken and sometimes hard-boiled eggs is the most popular traditional food in Ethiopia, often eaten as part of a group who share a communal bowl and basket of injera.

Mitmita:
It is a powdered seasoning mix used in Ethiopian cuisine. It is orange-red in color and contains ground birdseye chili peppers (piri piri), cardamom seed, cloves and salt. It occasionally has other spices including cinnamon, cumin and ginger.

Coffee:
According to some sources, drinking of coffee (buna) is likely to have originated in Ethiopia. A key national beverage, it is an important part of local commerce.

The coffee ceremony is the traditional serving of coffee, usually after a big meal. It often involves the use of a jebena, a clay coffee pot in which the coffee is boiled. The preparer roasts the coffee beans in front of guests, then walks around wafting the smoke throughout the room so participants may sample the scent of coffee.

Snacks, such as popcorn, are often served with the coffee. A complete coffee ceremony includes the burning of frankincense.

FAT Engineers on other social media:
Facebook: https://www.fb.com/FATEngineers/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/FATEngineers/